Distribution of inorganic bromine and metals during co-combustion of polycarbonate (BrPC) and high-impact polystyrene (BrHIPS) wastes containing brominated flame retardants (BFRs) with metallurgical dust

Mariusz Grabda, Sylwia Oleszek, Etsuro Shibata, Takashi Nakamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study focused on the thermal degradation of polycarbonate (BrPC) and high-impact polystyrene (BrHIPS), containing different brominated flame retardants. The evolved inorganic bromine was utilized for the separation of metals present in electric arc furnace dust (EAFD). The thermal degradation of BrPC generated inorganic gaseous HBr (69%) and condensable Br2 (31%). The bromine evolved from BrHIPS was detected almost entirely in a condensed phase as SbBr3. When mixed with EAFD, the evolved inorganic bromine reacted immediately with the metallic components of zinc and lead, but not with iron. The best bromination efficiencies were obtained during the isothermal heating (80 min at 550 °C) of the mixtures at mass ratios of 6:1 and 9:1 w/w under oxidizing conditions. The achieved brominating rates reached 78 and 81% for zinc and 90 and 94% for lead in 6:1 and 9:1 BrPC:EAFD, respectively, and 47 and 65% for zinc and 67 and 63% for lead in 6:1 and 9:1 BrHIPS:EAFD, respectively. The oxidizing condition favored complete vaporization of the formed bromides.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)201-213
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Material Cycles and Waste Management
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 1

Keywords

  • Inorganic bromine utilization
  • Metallurgical dust
  • Metals separation
  • Polycarbonate and high-impact polystyrene
  • Waste combustion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Mechanics of Materials

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Distribution of inorganic bromine and metals during co-combustion of polycarbonate (BrPC) and high-impact polystyrene (BrHIPS) wastes containing brominated flame retardants (BFRs) with metallurgical dust'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this