Distinct dopamine neurons mediate reward signals for short- and long-term memories

Nobuhiro Yamagata, Toshiharu Ichinose, Yoshinori Aso, Pierre Yves Plaçais, Anja B. Friedrich, Richard J. Sima, Thomas Preat, Gerald M. Rubin, Hiromu Tanimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drosophila melanogaster can acquire a stable appetitive olfactory memory when the presentation of a sugar reward and an odor are paired. However, the neuronal mechanisms by which a single training induces long-term memory are poorly understood. Here we show that two distinct subsets of dopamine neurons in the fly brain signal reward for short-term (STM) and long-term memories (LTM). One subset induces memory that decays within several hours, whereas the other induces memory that gradually develops after training. They convey reward signals to spatially segregated synaptic domains of the mushroom body (MB), a potential site for convergence. Furthermore, we identified a single type of dopamine neuron that conveys the reward signal to restricted subdomains of the mushroom body lobes and induces long-term memory. Constant appetitive memory retention after a single training session thus comprises two memory components triggered by distinct dopamine neurons.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)578-583
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume112
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 13

Keywords

  • Dopamine
  • Drosophila
  • Learning and memory
  • Mushroom body

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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