Differential expression of N-CAM, vimentin and MAP1B during initial pathfinding of olfactory receptor neurons in the mouse embryo

Kaori Aoki, Noriko Osumi-Yamashita, Youichirou Ninomiya, Kazuhiro Eto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Olfactory receptor neurons extend their primary axons from the nasal epithelium to the olfactory bulb primordium via the frontonasal mesenchyme. In the present study, expression of neuronal markers (vimentin and MAP1B) and N-CAM was immunohistochemically investigated in the development of the olfactory system in mouse embryos. Expression of vimentin and MAP1B was first observed at early day 10 of gestation (D10) in the posterosuperior region of the medial nasal epithelium, while N-CAM was initially detected in the mesenchyme adjacent to the vimentin- and MAP1B-positive nasal epithelium. As development proceeded, the N-CAM positive region in the nasal mesenchyme became broader and reached the olfactory bulb primordium late on day 10. In comparision with adjacent sections, the localization of neuronal marker-positive cells was mostly included in the N-CAM positive region. In addition, we adopted in situ labelling with vital dye (DiI) to directly determine the localization of the olfactory nerve and N-CAM on the same sections. We demonstrated that most extending axons were located in the N-CAM positive region. These results suggest that the expression of N-CAM plays a crucial role in the initial pathfinding of the olfactory nerve.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)211-220
Number of pages10
JournalAnatomy and Embryology
Volume192
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1995 Sep
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Axon pathfinding
  • DiI
  • Mouse whole-embryo culture
  • N-CAM
  • Olfactory receptor neuron

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Embryology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

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