Differences in resource storage pattern between Laminaria longissima and Laminaria diabolica (Laminariaceae; Phaeophyta) reflecting their morphological characteristics

Jing Yu Li, Yukio Agatsuma, Takeshi Nagai, Yoichi Sato, Kazuya Taniguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The kelps Laminaria longissima and L. diabolica, belonging to the groups of L. angustata and L. japonica, respectively, differ greatly in their morphological characteristics although their geographical distributions overlap widely along the eastern coast of Hokkaido. To clarify the interaction between the morphological and physiological characteristics of the two species, and their link with environmental variables, hatchery-raised young sporophytes of L. longissima and L. diabolica collected from Hokkaido were cultivated simultaneously under similar conditions in Matsushima Bay, Miyagi, from January to July 2004. Seasonal morphological characteristics, gross photosynthetic rate, nutrient uptake rates, and resource contents were examined. The blade lengths of L. longissima and L. diabolica reached a maximum of 329.9 cm and 256.7 cm, respectively, in April to May, and decreased to 284.4 cm and 68.6 cm, respectively, in July. The total elongation length of L. longissima (412.5 cm) was similar to that of L. diabolica (373.8 cm). However, the total erosion length of L. longissima (145.9 cm) was approximately half that of L. diabolica (302.9 cm). The gross photosynthetic rate and uptake rates of NH4-N, NO3-N, and PO4-P of the two species were similar. However, the carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus contents were transferred and stored in the whole blade tissues in the case of L. longissima, but in the meristem of L. diabolica from May to June. These results suggest that morphological differences are a response to different resource storage patterns. The storage patterns of L. longissima and L. diabolica are likely to be genetically fixed characteristics, which have evolved in adaptation to the specific habitat environments of the groups of L. angustata and L. japonica. The low water temperature and rich nutrients provided by the Oyashio Current are conducive to storage of resources in the whole blade tissues and a large surface area retained for photosynthesis and nutrient uptake in the L. angustata group. Conversely, high temperature and poor nutrients, or large fluctuations in these parameters, provided by the Tsushima Warm Current are more conducive to intensive storage of resources in the meristem for maturation and further growth in the L. japonica group. L. diabolica retains the storage pattern of the L. japonica group but grows in regions affected by the Oyashio Current, allowing it to become the widest distributed Laminaria species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)215-224
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Applied Phycology
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Apr 1

Keywords

  • Habitat environment
  • Laminaria diabolica
  • Laminaria longissima
  • Morphological characteristics
  • Resource storage pattern

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Plant Science

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