Development of soft ionization using direct current pulse glow discharge plasma source in mass spectrometry for volatile organic compounds analysis

Yoko Nunome, Kenji Kodama, Yasuaki Ueki, Ryo Yoshiie, Ichiro Naruse, Kazuaki Wagatsuma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study describes an ionization source for mass analysis, consisting of glow discharge plasma driven by a pulsed direct-current voltage for soft plasma ionization, to detect toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) rapidly and easily. The novelty of this work is that a molecular adduct ion, in which the parent molecule attaches with an NO+ radical, [M + NO]+, can be dominantly detected as a base peak with little or no fragmentation of them in an ambient air plasma at a pressure of several kPa. Use of ambient air as the discharge plasma gas is suitable for practical applications. The higher pressure in an ambient air discharge provided a stable glow discharge plasma, contributing to the soft ionization of organic molecules. Typical mass spectra of VOCs toluene, benzene, o-xylene, chlorobenzene and n-hexane were observed as [M + NO]+ adduct ion whose peaks were detected at m/z 122, 108, 136, 142 and 116, respectively. The NO generation was also confirmed by emission bands of NO γ-system. The ionization reactions were suggested, such that NO+ radical formed in an ambient air discharge could attach with the analyte molecule.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-49
Number of pages6
JournalSpectrochimica Acta - Part B Atomic Spectroscopy
Volume139
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan

Keywords

  • Emission spectrometry
  • Mass spectrometry
  • Pulse glow discharge plasma
  • Soft ionization
  • VOCs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Instrumentation
  • Spectroscopy

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