Development of prediction equation for methane-related traits in beef cattle under high concentrate diets

Yoshinobu Uemoto, Shinichiro Ogawa, Masahiro Satoh, Hiroyuki Abe, Fuminori Terada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The objective of this study was to develop a prediction equation for methane-related traits in beef cattle and evaluate this equation using datasets with different cattle breeds and roughage rates. Enteric methane emission (CH4, l/day) was measured using open-circuit respiration chambers. Dry matter intake (DMI, kg/day), body weight (BW, kg), daily gain (DG, kg), total digestible nutrients (TDN, %DMI), and roughage rate (Rrate, %) were used as independent variables, and methane-related traits—CH4, CH4 per DMI (CH4/DMI, l/kg), and methane conversion factor (MCF, %)—were used as dependent variables. The best-fit equations to predict methane-related traits using a total of 76 records were CH4 = –676.7 + 0.04194 × BW + 29.88 × DMI + 7.883 × TDN + 4.367 × Rrate, CH4/DMI = –52.24 – 1.193 × 10–3 × BW – 5.905 × DG + 1.077 × TDN + 0.5008 × Rrate, and MCF = –11.43 – 5.308 × 10–4 × BW – 1.223 × DG + 0.2336 × TDN + 0.1157 × Rrate. The predictive ability of the developed equations differed between roughage rates but not between breeds. For CH4, the predictive ability of the developed equations was better compared with previously reported equations in the low roughage rate dataset, but not in the high roughage rate dataset. Our results suggest that the developed equations of methane-related traits can be applied in beef cattle fed with low roughage diets.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13341
JournalAnimal Science Journal
Volume91
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Jan 1

Keywords

  • beef cattle
  • enteric methane emission
  • open-circuit respiration chambers
  • prediction equation
  • roughage rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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