Development of involuntary movements after ventriculoperitoneal shunting for normal pressure hydrocephalus in a patient with chronic-phase thalamic haemorrhage

Keiichiro Shindo, Takeo Kondo, Ken Sugiyama, Kazunori Nishijima, Yoshihito Furusawa, Takayuki Mori, Shin Ichi Izumi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Delayed-onset involuntary movements have been described after thalamic stroke. Methods: We treated a patient with involuntary movements that increased after ventriculoperitoneal shunting (VPS) for normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) following thalamic haemorrage. One and one-half years after right thalamic and intraventricular haemorrhage, NPH suggested clinical evaluation and neuroimaging studies in a 56-year-old man. Results: Hemidystonia and pseudochoreoathetosis were evident in the left arm, leg and trunk. Proprioceptive impairment and mild cerebellar dysfunction affected the left upper and lower extremity. Yet the patient could walk unassisted and carry out activities of daily living (ADL) rated as 90 points according to the Barthel Index (BI). Lumbar puncture lessened both gait disturbance and cognitive impairment. After VPS, cognition and urinary continence improved, but involuntary movements worsened, precluding unaided ambulation and decreasing the BI score to 65 points. Computed tomography after VPS showed resolution of NPH, while single-photon emission computed tomography showed increased cerebral blood flow after VPS. Conclusion: Increased cerebral blood flow after VPS is suspected to have promoted development of abnormal neuronal circuitry.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1195-1198
Number of pages4
JournalBrain Injury
Volume21
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Oct

Keywords

  • Involuntary movement
  • Normal pressure hydrocephalus
  • Stroke
  • Thalamus
  • Ventriculoperitoneal shunting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology

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