Development of in situ Brillouin spectroscopy at high pressure and high temperature with synchrotron radiation and infrared laser heating system: Application to the Earth's deep interior

Motohiko Murakami, Yuki Asahara, Yasuo Ohishi, Naohisa Hirao, Kei Hirose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Seismic wave velocity profiles in the Earth provide one of the strongest constraints on structure, mineralogy and elastic properties of the Earth's deep interior. Accurate sound velocity data of deep Earth materials under relevant high-pressure and high-temperature conditions, therefore, are essential for interpretation of seismic data. Such information can be directly obtained from Brillouin scattering measurement. Here we describe an in situ Brillouin scattering system for measurements at high pressure and high temperature using a laser heated diamond anvil cell and synchrotron radiation for sample characterization. The system has been used with single-crystal and polycrystalline materials, and with glass and fluid phase. It provided high quality sound velocity and elastic data with X-ray diffraction data at high pressure and/or high temperature. Those combined techniques can potentially offer the essential information for resolving many remaining issues in mineral physics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)282-291
Number of pages10
JournalPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors
Volume174
Issue number1-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 May
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Earth's interior
  • Elasticity
  • High pressure and high temperature
  • Mineral physics
  • Sound velocities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Geophysics
  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science

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