Development of a simulator for indoor airflow distribution in a cross-ventilated building using the local dynamic similarity model

Tomoyuki Endo, Takashi Kurabuchi, Toshihiro Nonaka, Mizuki Ishii, Masaaki Ohba, Tomonobu Goto, Yoshihiko Akamine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, the evaluation of cross ventilation is presented based on the simultaneous analysis of inside and outside conditions and for wind directions other than 0 degrees (i.e. for wind flow that is not aimed directly or normally to the inflow opening). The first part of the paper considers a conventional CFD analysis and compares the performance of the widely used k-ε turbulence model as well as the modified Durbin k-ε turbulence model. While a CFD approach can give good results it is very labour and computationally demanding. The second part of this paper consists of a description of a simplified approach based on the Local Dynamic Similarity Model. In the simplified approach, outdoor boundary conditions are established directly at the inflow opening by means of either wind tunnel experiment or CFD analysis of external flow conditions. Results of the simplified model are compared with experimental analysis and shown to give good agreement. The method is also shown to be valid for single and multi room applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-42
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Ventilation
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Jun
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Computational fluid dynamics (CFD)
  • Cross-ventilation
  • Discharge coefficient
  • Indoor air flow
  • Inflow angle
  • Local dynamic similarity model
  • Wind pressure
  • k-ε model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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