Development and validation of the Japanese version of the Decisional Conflict Scale to investigate the value of pharmacists' information: A before and after study

Takashi Kawaguchi, Kanako Azuma, Takuhiro Yamaguchi, Hiroshi Soeda, Yusuke Sekine, Masayoshi Koinuma, Hironori Takeuchi, Takao Akashi, Sakae Unezaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The information provided in patient-centered care and shared decision-making influences patients' concerns and adherence to treatment. In the decision-making process, patients experience decisional conflict. The Decisional Conflict Scale (DCS) is a 16-item, self-administered questionnaire consisting of 5 subscales developed to assess patients' decisional conflict. This study aimed to develop the Japanese version of the DCS and to clarify the influence of the information provided by pharmacists' on decisional conflict among patients with cancer. Methods. We developed the Japanese version of the DCS by using the forward-backward translation method. One hundred patients who were recommended a new chemotherapy regimen were recruited. The psychometric properties of the Japanese DCS, including internal consistency, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and construct validity, were examined. We assessed the decisional conflict of patients before and after the pharmacists' provision of information. Results: Ninety-four patients, predominately female, with an average age of 58.1 years were sampled. The scores on the 5 subscales of the DCS showed high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.84-0.96). Multi-trait scaling analysis and cluster analysis showed strong validity. The mean total DCS score decreased significantly from 40.2 to 31.7 after patients received information from the pharmacists (p < 0.001, paired t-test). Scores on all 5 subscales, namely, uncertainty, informed, values clarity, support, and effective decision, also significantly improved (p < 0.001 for all categories, paired t-test). Conclusions: The psychometric properties of the Japanese version of the DCS are considered appropriate for it to be administered to patients with cancer. Pharmacists' provision of information was able to decrease decisional conflict among patients with cancer who were recommended a new chemotherapy regimen.

Original languageEnglish
Article number50
JournalBMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Chemotherapy
  • Decisional conflict scale
  • Pharmacist

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Health Informatics

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