Determination of total contents of bromine, iodine and several trace elements in soil by polarizing energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

Akira Takeda, Shin ichi Yamasaki, Hirofumi Tsukada, Yuichi Takaku, Shun'ichi Hisamatsu, Noriyoshi Tsuchiya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A non-destructive analysis method for total bromine (Br) and iodine (I) contents in soil was established using polarizing energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry. The matrix-corrected intensity of Br and I Kα X-rays from pressed pellets of soil powder samples was calibrated with their contents measured by inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-mass spectrometry after pyrohydrolysis preparation. The calibration curves for Br and I were successfully obtained in the concentration ranges 3.8-223 mg kg-1 and 0.91-54 mg kg-1 respectively. Repeated analyses of the same sample with polarizing EDXRF spectrometry within one day and after approximately 1.5 years showed good reproducibility of the measurement results. The lower limits of detection for Br and 1 were 0.14 mg kg-1 and 0.34 mg kg-1 respectively. The established analytical method for total Br and I contents in soil is non-destructive, simple and rapid, and is suitable for routine analysis. Trace elements such as rubidium (Rb), strontium (Sr), yttrium (Y), zirconium (Zr), niobium (Nb), cadmium (Cd), tin (Sn), antimony (Sb), caesium (Cs), barium (Ba), light rare earth elements and lead (Pb) were also measurable simultaneously under the identical operational conditions as those for Br and I measurements.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-28
Number of pages10
JournalSoil Science and Plant Nutrition
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Feb 1

Keywords

  • Bromine
  • Halogens
  • ICP-MS
  • Iodine
  • Polarizing EDXRF

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Plant Science

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