Detection of hormone active chemicals using genetically engineered yeast cells and microfluidic devices with interdigitated array electrodes

Kosuke Ino, Yusuke Kitagawa, Tsuyoshi Watanabe, Hitoshi Shiku, Masahiro Koide, Tomoaki Itayama, Tomoyuki Yasukawa, Tomokazu Matsue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Endocrine disruptors that act like hormones in the endocrine system might have toxic effects. Therefore, it is important to develop a portable device that can detect hormone active chemicals in samples rapidly and easily. In this study, a microfluidic device was developed for the detection of hormone active chemicals using genetically engineered yeast cells. The yeast cells were used as biosensors since they were genetically engineered to respond to the presence of hormone active chemicals by synthesizing β-galactosidase (β-gal). For achieving further sensitivity, we incorporated interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes (width, 1.2 μm; gap, 0.8 μm) with 40 electrode fingers into the analytical chamber of the microfluidic device. The yeast cells precultured with a hormone active chemical, 17β-estradiol (E2), were trapped from the main channel of the device to the analytical camber by electrophoresis. After trapping in the analytical chamber, we performed electrochemical detection of β-gal induced in the yeast cells with the IDA electrodes. Actually, electrochemical detection was performed on β-aminophenol that was converted from p-aminophenyl-β-D-galactopyranoside with β-gal. The electrochemical signals from the yeast cells precultured with 17β-estradiol were successfully detected with the device. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of antagonists such as tamoxifen were also detected electrochemically by using the device. Thus, the present microfluidic device can be used for highly sensitive detection of hormone active chemicals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3406-3412
Number of pages7
JournalElectrophoresis
Volume30
Issue number19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Dec 4

Keywords

  • Genetically engineered yeast cell
  • Hormone active chemical
  • IDA electrode
  • Lab-on-a-chip device
  • Redox cycling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry

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