Detection of Antibody-Coated Bacteria in Expectorated Sputum for Diagnosis of Lower Respiratory Infections

Tetsuya Matsumoto, Mitsuo Kaku, Kazuhiro Tateda, Keizo Yamaguchi, Nobuhiko Furuya, Yoichi Hirakata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We evaluated antibody-coated bacteria (ACB) in expectorated sputum to discriminate contaminating or colonizing organisms from true pathogens. We examined 60 expectorated sputum samples from 51 patients with lower respiratory infections (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease 25, pneumonia 20, purulent tracheobronchitis 6). All samples were examined with quantitative culture and immunofluorescent demonstration of ACB. From the results of quantitative culture, we divided specimens into pathogen-isolated and pathogen-free samples. Among pathogen-isolated samples, in which we isolated accepted pathogenic organisms at 107 colony-forming units per ml, 16 of 23 samples were ACB-positive (69.5%). In contrast, among pathogen-free samples, in which we isolated accepted pathogens at < 107 colony forming units per ml or only upper respiratory flora, only 3 of 37 samples were ACB-positive (8.1%). The ACB-positive rate was significantly higher in pathogen-isolated than in pathogen-free samples (P < 0.001). Consequently, detecting ACB in expectorated sputum shows good potential as another criterion for distinguishing contaminating or colonizing organisms from true pathogens.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-293
Number of pages7
JournalMICROBIOLOGY and IMMUNOLOGY
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Keywords

  • Antibody-coated bacteria
  • Diagnosis
  • Lower respiratory infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Virology

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