Detection of antibodies to Borrelia species among patients with confirmed sarcoidosis in a region where Lyme disease is nonendemic

Mami Ishihara, Takako Ishida, Emiko Isogai, Koh'ichi Kimura, Masaru Oritsu, Yasuo Matsui, Hiroshi Isogai, Shigeaki Ohno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Lyme disease is a multisystemic disorder caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, while sarcoidosis is a multisystemic granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between Lyme disease and sarcoidosis. Methods: We examined the seroprevalence of antibody to Borellia species in patients with sarcoidosis. We performed the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, using three Japanese Borrelia species in addition to B. burgdorferi, and dotblot analysis using purified Borrelia-specific proteins in 38 patients with histopathologically confirmed sarcoidosis and 80 healthy controls. Results: Two patients (5.3%) were positive for antibodies to Borrelia species according to one or both assays, and one (1.2%) healthy control was positive. In both patients it was suspected that Borrelia infection had developed prior to the development of sarcoidosis. Conclusion: Borrelia species were thought not to be responsible for the development of sarcoidosis in a nonendemic region in Japan. Since clinical manifestations of Lyme disease share certain similarities with those seen in sarcoidosis, ophthalmologists should be aware of the need to differentiate between the two diseases and the need for prompt treatment in each case.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)770-773
Number of pages4
JournalGraefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology
Volume234
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996 Dec

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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