Design and Experimental Verification of a 0.19 v 53 μw 65 nm CMOS Integrated Supply-Sensing Sensor with a Supply-Insensitive Temperature Sensor and an Inductive-Coupling Transmitter for a Self-Powered Bio-sensing System Using a Biofuel Cell

Atsuki Kobayashi, Kei Ikeda, Yudai Ogawa, Hiroyuki Kai, Matsuhiko Nishizawa, Kazuo Nakazato, Kiichi Niitsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, we present a self-powered bio-sensing system with the capability of proximity inductive-coupling communication for supply sensing and temperature monitoring. The proposed bio-sensing system includes a biofuel cell as a power source and a sensing frontend that is associated with the CMOS integrated supply-sensing sensor. The sensor consists of a digital-based gate leakage timer, a supply-insensitive time-domain temperature sensor, and a current-driven inductive-coupling transmitter and achieves low-voltage operation. The timer converts the output voltage from a biofuel cell to frequency. The temperature sensor provides a pulse width modulation (PWM) output that is not dependent on the supply voltage, and the associated inductive-coupling transmitter enables proximity communication. A test chip was fabricated in 65 nm CMOS technology and consumed 53 μW with a supply voltage of 190 mV. The low-voltage-friendly design satisfied the performance targets of each integrated sensor without any trimming. The chips allowed us to successfully demonstrate proximity communication with an asynchronous receiver, and the measurement results show the potential for self-powered operation using biofuel cells. The analysis and experimental verification of the system confirmed their robustness.

Original languageEnglish
Article number8080162
Pages (from-to)1313-1323
Number of pages11
JournalIEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Dec

Keywords

  • Bio-sensing
  • CMOS
  • IoT
  • biofuel cell
  • inductive coupling
  • self-powered
  • supply sensing
  • temperature sensor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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