Decreased time on the nondominant one-leg standing test associated with repeated falls in older residents with healthy aging, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia: The wakuya project

Keiichi Kumai, Mika Kumai, Junko Takada, Jiro Oonuma, Kei Nakamura, Kenichi Meguro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of this study is to clarify the association between repeated falls and the dominant/nondominant side in the open-eyed one-leg standing (OLS) test among people who are healthy or have mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia in a community setting. We recruited 180 participants from 39 areas in the town of Wakuya. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. Participants were classified into 3 Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) groups, i.e., CDR 0 (healthy, n = 71), CDR 0.5 (MCI, n = 85), and CDR 1+ (n = 23), and they were investigated for motor function (grip strength, 6-m normal gait speed, timed up and go test, and OLS test) and falls during the past year. Results: Subjects with a CDR of 0.5 had higher rates of single and repeated falls (13.0 and 23.4%, respectively) than the CDR 0 group (12.1 and 4.5%, respectively), as did those in CDR 1+ group (15.0 and 30.0%). For the CDR 0.5 group, the frequency of falls was negatively (biologically meaningful direction) correlated with the left OLS time. No significant correlations with falls were found for other motor function tests. Another analysis separating the CDR 0.5 group into 2 subgroups (repeated falls vs. no or a single fall) also showed that the left OLS time was lower in subjects with repeated falls. Conclusion: People with MCI who had fallen repeatedly in the year before the assessment had a significantly lower left OLS time compared to those who had not fallen or had had 1 fall with MCI. None of the other physical measures were associated with past repeat falls including OLS on the dominant right side. No such findings were noted in the CDR 0 and CDR 0+ groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)122-128
Number of pages7
JournalDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders Extra
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 May 21

Keywords

  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Nondominant leg
  • Older adults/people/persons
  • One-leg standing
  • Repeated falls

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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