Coulomb Stress Evolution History as Implication on the Pattern of Strong Earthquakes along the Xianshuihe-Xiaojiang Fault System, China

Bing Yan, Shinji Toda, Aiming Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coulomb stress accumulation and releasing history and its relationship with the occurrence of strong historical earthquakes could deepen our understanding of the occurrence pattern of strong earthquakes and hence its seismic potential in future. The sinistral strike-slip Xianshuihe- Xiaojiang fault zone (XXFS) is one of the most dangerous fault zones in China, extending 1 500-km-long from the central Tibetan Plateau to the Red River fault zone. There are 35 M≥6.5 historical earthquakes occurred since 1327, hence it is an ideal site for studying the Coulomb stress evolution history and its relationship with the occurrences of strong earthquakes. In this study, we evaluated the Coulomb stress change history along the XXFS by synthesizing fault geometry, GPS data and historical earthquakes. Coulomb stress change history also revealed different patterns of historical earthquakes on different segments of the XXFS, such as characteristic recurrence intervals along the Salaha-Moxi fault and super-cycles along the Xianshuihe fault. Based on the occurrence pattern of past historical earthquakes and current Coulomb stress field obtained in this study, we suggest positive ΔCFS and hence high seismic potential along the Salaha-Moxi fault and the Anninghe fault.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)427-440
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Earth Science
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Apr 1

Keywords

  • Coulomb stress triggering theory
  • Tibetan Plateau
  • Xianshuihe-Xiaojiang fault system
  • recurrence interval
  • seismic hazard

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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