Correlation of high-temperature steam oxidation with hydrogen dissolution in pure iron and ternary high-chromium ferritic steel

Masaaki Nakai, Kensuke Nagai, Yoshinori Murata, Masahiko Morinaga, Shigeaki Matsuda, Motohiro Kanno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The high-temperature oxidation in both air and steam was examined experimentally with pure iron and a Fe-10Cr-0.08C (mass%) ternary ferritic steel. In case of pure iron, the thickness of the oxide scale formed in steam at 923 K for 360 ks was comparable to that of the scale formed in air. On the other hand, in case of the ternary ferritic steel, the oxide scale formed was much thicker in steam than in air, Thus, the oxidation rate was nearly independent of the air and the steam atmosphere for pure iron, but was dependent for the ternary ferritic steel. In the present study, this difference was investigated from a viewpoint of the hydrogen dissolution in the oxide scale during the steam oxidation. The amount of dissolved hydrogen was measured using a thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). It was found that the amount of the dissolved hydrogen was much larger in the ternary ferritic steel than in pure iron. Also, it was shown that the hydrogen dissolution in the ternary ferritic steel was related to the presence of (Fe,Cr)3O4 in the oxide scale. The defect structure in this chromium-rich oxide was modified by hydrogen dissolution, so that the ionic diffusion could be enhanced in it, resulting in the more accelerated oxidation rate in steam.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1066-1072
Number of pages7
JournalIsij International
Volume45
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Keywords

  • Air
  • High chromium ferritic steel
  • High-temperature oxidation
  • Hydrogen dissolution
  • Pure iron
  • Steam

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Metals and Alloys
  • Materials Chemistry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Correlation of high-temperature steam oxidation with hydrogen dissolution in pure iron and ternary high-chromium ferritic steel'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this