Converting an insulating silicon nanochain to a conducting carbon nanotube by electrical breakdown

T. Nogami, Yutaka Ohno, S. Ichikawa, H. Kohno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Electrical breakdowns of individual silicon nanochains, in which silicon nanoparticles are covered with and connected by oxide alternatively forming nanowires, are studied by insitu transmission electron microscopy using a microprobe system. Individual silicon nanochains can endure a current typically as large as 10°nA, and we found that a silicon nanochain can be converted to a nanotube by applying a current as large as 101nA. In the nanotubes, some silicon particles are left. Experimental results suggest that nanotubes are heavily distorted carbon nanotubes, which are formed through the aggregation of contaminating carbon on the nanochain surface and the evaporation of the oxide core due to Joule heating.

Original languageEnglish
Article number335602
JournalNanotechnology
Volume20
Issue number33
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Aug 19

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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