Convection-enhanced delivery of nanoliposomal CPT-11 (irinotecan) and PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) in rodent intracranial brain tumor xenografts

Michal T. Krauze, Charles O. Noble, Tomohiro Kawaguchi, Daryl Drummond, Dmitri B. Kirpotin, Yoji Yamashita, Erika Kullberg, John Forsayeth, John W. Park, Krystof S. Bankiewicz

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91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have previously shown that convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of highly stable nanoparticle/liposome agents encapsulating chemotherapeutic drugs is effective against intracranial rodent brain tumor xenografts. In this study, we have evaluated the combination of a newly developed nanoparticle/liposome containing the topoi-somerase I inhibitor CPT-11 (nanoliposomal CPT-11 [nLs-CPT-11]), and PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) containing the topoisomerase II inhibitor doxo-rubicin. Both drugs were detectable in the CNS for more than 36 days after a single CED application. Tissue half-life was 16.7 days for nLs-CPT-11 and 10.9 days for Doxil. The combination of the two agents produced synergistic cytotoxicity in vitro. In vivo in U251MG and U87MG intracranial rodent xenograft models, CED of the combination was also more efficacious than either agent used singly. Analysis of the parameters involved in this approach indicated that tissue pharmacokinetics, tumor microanatomy, and biochemical interactions of the drugs all contributed to the therapeutic efficacy observed. These findings have implications for further clinical applications of CED-based treatment of brain tumors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)393-403
Number of pages11
JournalNeuro-Oncology
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Oct

Keywords

  • Brain tumor
  • CED
  • CPT-11
  • Doxil
  • Irinotecan
  • Liposome
  • Xenograft

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cancer Research

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