Controlled Conversion of Proteins into High-Molecular-Weight Peptides without Additives with High-Temperature Water and Fast Heating Rates

Taku Michael Aida, Minori Oshima, Richard Lee Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein in high-temperature (200-260 °C) water (HTW) with fast heating rates (ca. 135-180 K·s-1) without acid or base additives gives high-molecular-weight (1500-8300 Da) peptides with minimal formation of amino acids and ammonia. The decrease in the number-average molecular weight of peptides after HTW treatment of BSA could be described by a kinetic model based on random scission mechanism of the polymer chain. Reaction of BSA in HTW under identical conditions with slow heating rates (ca. 0.25 K·s-1) gives peptides of low molecular weight with formation of amino acids and ammonia for which the kinetics could not be described by a random scission mechanism. The activation energy determined for the conversion of BSA into high-molecular-weight peptides with fast heating rates in high-temperature water was 16.4 kJ·mol-1. Reaction of proteins in high-temperature water with fast heating rates inhibits initial aggregation that occurs during slow heating rates and allows controlled conversion of the denatured polymer chain into high-molecular-weight peptides.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7709-7715
Number of pages7
JournalACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering
Volume5
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Sep 5

Keywords

  • Amino acids
  • Biomass
  • Biopolymers
  • Hydrothermal
  • Peptides
  • Reaction kinetics
  • Reaction mechanism
  • Subcritical water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment

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