Control of self-folding cell-laden microplates by cytoskeleton alignment to fibronectin patterns

Daniela Serien, Kaori Kuribayaski-Shigetomi, Shotaro Yoshida, Shoji Takeuchi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We propose a method to control cell driven microplate folding by fibronectin patterning. Fibronectin patterns were printed to the plates by micro contact printing. NIH/3T3 cells were seeded at a single cell level. After adhesion, cells spread and their cytoskeleton aligned to the fibronectin pattern. The microplates were detached and folded by cell traction forces of adhered cells. Our results indicate that microplate folding is dependent 011 the fibronectin pattern. Cell traction forces can be directed by fibronectin patterning via cytoskeleton alignment. Our approach broadens fundamental research 011 cell traction forces and opens further possibilities in tissue engineering.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012
PublisherChemical and Biological Microsystems Society
Pages1588-1590
Number of pages3
ISBN (Print)9780979806452
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes
Event16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012 - Okinawa, Japan
Duration: 2012 Oct 282012 Nov 1

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012

Other

Other16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012
CountryJapan
CityOkinawa
Period12/10/2812/11/1

Keywords

  • Cytoskeleton
  • Fibronectin patterning
  • Microplate
  • Parylene
  • Self-folding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Bioengineering

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