Continuous intake of a high-fat diet beyond one generation promotes lipid accumulation in liver and white adipose tissue of female mice

Mariko Takasaki, Taro Honma, Miyuki Yanaka, Kenta Sato, Nahoko Shinohara, Junya Ito, Yurie Tanaka, Tsuyoshi Tsuzuki, Ikuo Ikeda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lipid metabolism in a child may be altered when the mother has a high-fat diet (HFD), but it is unclear whether the lipid metabolism of future offspring (grandchildren) is also changed under these circumstances. In this study, we examined the influence of intake of an HFD beyond one generation on offspring in normal mice. Parent mice fed an HFD were bred and the resultant second and third generations were also fed an HFD. The diets used in the study had approximately 20% more energy than a standard chow diet. Changes in lipid metabolism were examined in each generation. Intake of an HFD from generation to generation promoted lipid accumulation in the white adipose tissue of female mice, increased lipid, glucose and insulin levels in the serum, increased the activities of enzymes associated with fatty acid metabolism in the liver, promoted lipid accumulation in hepatocytes and adipocytes and increased the mRNA levels of Cdkn1a in the liver and white adipose tissue. These results suggest that activation of Cdkn1a promoted lipid accumulation in the liver and white adipose tissue of third-generation female mice that were offspring from earlier generations fed HFDs. Moreover, intake of a high-energy diet beyond one generation led to offspring with obesity, fatty liver and hyperinsulinemia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)640-645
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nutritional Biochemistry
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jun 1

Keywords

  • Cdkn1a
  • Fatty liver
  • High-fat diet
  • Insulin resistance
  • Obesity
  • Offspring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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