Conserved N-terminal cysteine motif is essential for homo-and heterodimer formation of synaptotagmins III, V, VI, and X

Mitsunori Fukuda, Eiko Kanno, Katsuhiko Mikoshiba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

133 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The synaptotagmins now constitute a large family of membrane proteins characterized by one transmembrane region and two C2 domains. Dimerization of synaptotagmin (Syt) I, a putative low affinity Ca2+ sensor for neurotransmitter release, is thought to be important for expression of function during exocytosis of synaptic vesicles. However, little is known about the self-dimerization properties of other isoforms. In this study, we demonstrate that a subclass of synaptotagmins (III, V, VI, and X) (Ibata, K., Fukuda, M., and Mikoshiba, K. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 12267-12273) forms β-mercaptoethanol-sensitive homodimers and identify three evolutionarily conserved cysteine residues at the N terminus (N-terminal cysteine motif, at amino acids 10, 21, and 33 of mouse Syt III) that are not conserved in other isoforms. Site-directed mutagenesis of these cysteine residues and co- immunoprecipitation experiments clearly indicate that the first cysteine residue is essential for the stable homodimer formation of Syt III, V, or VI, and heterodimer formation between Syts III, V, VI, and X. We also show that native Syt III from mouse brain forms a β-mercaptoethanol-sensitive homodimer. Our results suggest that the cysteine-based heterodimerization between Syt III and Syt V, VI, or X, which have different biochemical properties, may modulate the proposed function of Syt III as a putative high affinity Ca2+ sensor for neurotransmitter release.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31421-31427
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume274
Issue number44
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999 Oct 29
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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