Concurrent dural and perimedullary arteriovenous fistulas at the craniocervical junction: Case series with special reference to angioarchitecture ; Clinical article

Kenichi Sato, Toshiki Endo, Kuniyasu Niizuma, Miki Fujimura, Takashi Inoue, Hiroaki Shimizu, Teiji Tominaga

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Object. Dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) and perimedullary arteriovenous fistulas (PAVFs) are uncommonly associated in the craniocervical junction. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical and angiographic characteristics of such concurrent lesions. Methods. Authors reviewed 9 cases with a coexistent DAVF and PAVF at the craniocervical junction. Clinical presentation, angiographic characteristics, intraoperative findings, and treatment outcomes were assessed. Results. All patients (male/female ratio 5:4; mean age 66.3 years) presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Angiography revealed that 8 patients had both a DAVF and PAVF on the same side, whereas 1 patient had 3 arteriovenous fistulas, 1 DAVF, and 1 PAVF on the right side and 1 DAVF on the left side. All of the fistulas shared dilated perimedullary veins (anterior spinal vein, 7 cases; anterolateral spinal vein, 2 cases) as a main drainage route. The shared drainage route was rostrally directed in 8 of 9 cases. Eight patients exhibited an arterial aneurysm on the distal side of the feeding arteries to the PAVF, and the aneurysm in each case was intraoperatively confirmed as a bleeding point. One patient had ruptured venous ectasia at the perimedullary fistulous point. All patients underwent direct surgery via a posterolateral approach. No recurrence was observed in the 4 patients who underwent postoperative angiography, and no rebleeding event was recorded among any of the 9 patients during the follow-up period (mean 38.4 months). Conclusions. The similarity of the angioarchitecture and the close anatomical relationship between DAVF and PAVF at the craniocervical junction suggested that these lesions are pathogenetically linked. The pathophysiological mechanism and anatomical features of these lesions represent a unique vascular anomaly that should be recognized angiographically to plan a therapeutic strategy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)451-459
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of neurosurgery
Volume118
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Feb

Keywords

  • Angiography
  • Craniocervical junction
  • Dural arteriovenous fistula
  • Perimedullary arteriovenous fistula
  • Spine
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage
  • Vascular disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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