Concise review: Clinical prospects for treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with regenerative approaches

Hiroshi Kubo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is becoming a major cause of death worldwide. COPD is characterized by a progressive and not fully reversible airflow limitation caused by chronic small airway disease and lung parenchymal destruction. Clinically available drugs improve airflow obstruction and respiratory symptoms but cannot cure the disease. Slowing the progressive lung destruction or rebuilding the destroyed lung structure is a promising strategy to cure COPD. In contrast to small animal models, pharmacological lung regeneration is difficult in human COPD. Maturation, aging, and senescence in COPD lung cells, including endogenous stem cells, may affect the regenerative capacity following pharmacological therapy. The lung is a complex organ composed of more than 40 different cell types; therefore, detailed analyses, such as epigenetic modification analysis, in each specific cell type have not been performed in lungs with COPD. Recently, a method for the direct isolation of individual cell types from human lung has been developed, and fingerprints of each cell type in COPD lungs can be analyzed. Research using this technique combined with the recently discovered lung endogenous stem-progenitor populations will give a better understanding about the fate of COPD lung cells and provide a future for cell-based therapy to treat this intractable disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)627-631
Number of pages5
JournalStem Cells Translational Medicine
Volume1
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • Adult stem cells
  • Cellular therapy
  • Clinical trials
  • Lung
  • Respiratory tract
  • Stem cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Concise review: Clinical prospects for treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with regenerative approaches'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this