Complexities and difficulties behind the implementation of reconstruction plans after the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami of March 2011

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The damage resulting from the Great East Japan Earthquake (GEJE) and subsequent tsunami necessitated a re-evaluation of the way land is used in the affected areas. Despite receiving various reconstruction subsidies, many disaster-affected municipalities have struggled in their rebuilding efforts under various difficulties: scarce resources, a sharp increase in construction costs, a shortage of expertise, and the strict application of the new tsunami mitigation rule (Two-Two Rule). However, it has been difficult to track these continuous challenges and struggles. Most reconstruction decisions are made at the municipal level, and the information is not widely shared. The author has participated in many reconstruction projects as an architectural planner and a reconstruction advisor. Based on the outcome of recent studies and the author’s own practical experiences, this article aims to show the actual status and challenges of reconstruction works after the GEJE.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Natural and Technological Hazards Research
PublisherSpringer Netherlands
Pages3-20
Number of pages18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Publication series

NameAdvances in Natural and Technological Hazards Research
Volume47
ISSN (Print)1878-9897
ISSN (Electronic)2213-6959

Keywords

  • Build Back Better
  • Community
  • Great East Japan Earthquake (GEJE)
  • Public housing
  • Relocation
  • Two-Two Rule

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Economic Geology
  • Computers in Earth Sciences
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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