Comparison of the effects of the 1975 japanese diet and the modern mediterranean diet on lipid metabolism in mice

Yui Mizowaki, Saeko Sugawara, Kazushi Yamamoto, Yu Sakamoto, Yui Iwagaki, Yuki Kawakami, Miki Igarashi, Tsuyoshi Tsuduki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Japanese diet and the Mediterranean diet are both known to be good for health, but there had been no direct comparison of their health benefits. In this study, we compared the 1975 Japanese diet, which has been found to have high health benefits, with the 2010 Italian diet, which contributes to the longest life expectancy in Mediterranean countries. Diets were created using one-week menus of the two diets based on FAOSTAT Food Balance Sheets. The diets were prepared, freeze-dried, powdered and fed to mice for 4 weeks to examine their effects on lipid metabolism. In mice fed the Japanese diet, the visceral fat weight was lower, adipocytes were smaller, the liver weight was lower and liver TG tended to be lower than those fed the Italian diet, and little lipid accumulation was observed in hepatocytes of mice fed the Japanese diet. In addition, in mice fed the Japanese diet, the expression levels of genes related to fatty acid synthesis were lower, whereas those of genes related to catabolism of fatty acids and cholesterol were higher than those fed the Italian diet. Therefore, the Japanese diet reduced accumulation of lipids in the white adipose tissue and liver by suppressing fatty acid synthesis and promoting catabolism of fatty acids and cholesterol in the liver, compared to the Italian diet.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)507-519
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of oleo science
Volume66
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • 1975 Japanese diet
  • Italian diet
  • Japanese diet
  • Lipid metabolism
  • Mediterranean diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

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