Comparison of PETINIA and LC-MS/MS for determining plasma mycophenolic acid concentrations in Japanese lung transplant recipients

Masafumi Kikuchi, Masaki Tanaka, Shinya Takasaki, Akiko Takahashi, Miki Akiba, Yasushi Matsuda, Masafumi Noda, Kanehiko Hisamichi, Hiroaki Yamaguchi, Yoshinori Okada, Nariyasu Mano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Mycophenolic acid (MPA) treatment requires therapeutic drug monitoring to improve the outcome after organ transplantation. The aim of this study was to compare two methods, a particle enhanced turbidimetric inhibition immunoassay (PETINIA) and a reference liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for determining plasma MPA concentrations from Japanese lung transplant recipients. Methods: Plasma MPA concentrations were determined from 20 Japanese lung transplant recipients using LC-MS/MS and the PETINIA on the Dimension Xpand Plus-HM analyzer. Results: The mean MPA concentration measured by PETINIA was significantly higher than that measured by LC-MS/MS (3.26±2.73 μg/mL versus 2.82±2.71 μg/mL, P<0.0001). The result of the Passing Bablok analysis was a slope of 1.104 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.036-1.150) and an intercept of 0.229 (95%CI, 0.144-0.315). Bland-Altman analysis revealed PETINIA overestimates plasma MPA concentration by 26.25% and 95%CI from 21.43 to 31.07%. Conclusion: The measurement of MPA by the PETINIA in Japanese lung transplant patients should evaluate the result with attention to positive bias.

Original languageEnglish
Article number7
JournalJournal of Pharmaceutical Health Care and Sciences
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Apr 2

Keywords

  • Japanese
  • LC-MS/MS
  • Lung transplant
  • Mycophenolic acid
  • Mycophenolic acid acyl glucuronide
  • PETINIA
  • Positive bias

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology (nursing)

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