Comparison of image properties in full-field phase X-ray microscopes based on grating interferometry and Zernike's phase contrast optics

Hidekazu Takano, Yanlin Wu, Jeff Irwin, Stan Maderych, Marty Leibowitz, Andrei Tkachuk, Arjun Kumar, Benjamin Hornberger, Atsushi Momose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A grating interferometer (GI) system has been installed in an X-ray microscope equipped with a Zernike phase contrast (ZPC) system and a Cu rotating anode X-ray source. The GI and ZPC systems are switchable, and their performances of phase information extraction have been compared. The GI system is based on a Lau interferometer consisting of an absorption grating and a π/2 phase grating, which extracts a magnified phase shift map of a sample via a phase-stepping measurement. The ZPC system generates a phase contrast image by using a phase plate and a corresponding condenser device. The ZPC system and the GI system are compared in terms of detectability of phase objects. By the Fourier analysis of images of a logarithmic ruler pattern, the spatial resolution was found to be identical between the two systems. Although the sensitivity depends on the sample size, the signal-to-noise ratio of polystyrene spheres with a few microns in diameter was used for sensitivity comparison, showing the superior sensitivity of the GI system to that of the ZPC system. The quantitativeness of the GI system with the phase-stepping measurement was also demonstrated over the ZPC system, which generates halo and shade-off artifacts. The GI system exhibits twin image artifacts that need to be resolved for practical applications of the technique.

Original languageEnglish
Article number063105
JournalApplied Physics Letters
Volume113
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Aug 6

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

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