Comparative cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate hexavalent chromium in human and hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) skin cells

Jamie L. Young, Sandra S. Wise, Hong Xie, Cairong Zhu, Tomokazu Fukuda, John Pierce Wise

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chromium is both a global marine pollutant and a known human health hazard. In this study, we compare the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of both soluble and particulate chromate in human and hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) skin fibroblasts. Our data show that both soluble and particulate Cr(VI) induce concentration-dependent increases in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular Cr ion concentrations in both human and hawksbill sea turtle fibroblasts. Based on administered concentration, particulate and soluble Cr(VI) were more cytotoxic and clastogenic to human cells than sea turtle cells. When the analysis was based on the intracellular concentration of Cr, the data showed that the response of both species was similar. The one exception was the cytotoxicity of intracellular Cr ions from soluble Cr(VI), which caused more cytotoxicity in sea turtle cells (LC50 = 271 μM) than that of human cells (LC50 = 471 μM), but its clastogenicity was similar between the two species. Thus, adjusting for differences in uptake indicated that the explanation for the difference in potency was mostly due to uptake rather than differently affected mechanisms. Overall these data indicate that sea turtles may be a useful sentinel for human health responses to marine pollution.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)145-155
Number of pages11
JournalComparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part - C: Toxicology and Pharmacology
Volume178
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Dec 1

Keywords

  • Chromate
  • Chromium
  • Genotoxicity
  • Hawksbill
  • Marine pollution
  • Sea turtle
  • Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physiology
  • Toxicology
  • Cell Biology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Comparative cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate hexavalent chromium in human and hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) skin cells'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this