Community-Based System, Reports, and Substantiated Cases of Elder Abuse: Disparities Between Municipalities and Relating Factors in Japan

Miharu Nakanishi, Taeko Nakashima, Nobuko Sakata, Noriko Tsuchiya, Kaoru Takizawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines (1) the staffing and financial characteristics of systems for elder abuse detection and intervention in the municipal governments of Japan and (2) the relationship among the development of detection and intervention systems, the reporting rates of suspected elder abuse cases, and substantiated abuse rates in 927 municipalities across Japan. Progressive systems for the detection and intervention of elder abuse were significantly associated with a larger number of public officers than in non-progressive systems. Furthermore, greater rates of both suspected and substantiated cases of abuse were associated with progressive systems for elder abuse detection and intervention. Per capita annual expenditures on the comprehensive support project and the community general support center's catchment under the Long-Term Care Insurance (LTCI) program showed no significant association with the development of systems, the rate of suspected cases, or the number of substantiated cases. National social policy makers should examine strategies that would help municipalities assign sufficient staff to elder abuse detection and intervention programs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)234-247
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Aging and Social Policy
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jul
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • elder abuse
  • Japan
  • local government
  • long-term care insurance
  • social policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Gerontology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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