Combining in situ transmission electron microscopy and molecular dynamics computer simulations to reveal the interaction mechanisms of dislocations with stacking-fault tetrahedron in nuclear materials

Yoshitaka Matsukawa, Martha Briceno, Ian M. Robertson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In situ straining experiments conducted in a transmission electron microscope have been performed to reveal how dislocations interact with and annihilate isolated stacking-fault tetrahedra, common defect clusters in irradiated face-centered cubic metals. Comparison of the experimental results with the predictions from molecular dynamics computer simulations shows some similarities and some striking differences. The comparison suggests challenges for the simulations and demonstrates how, despite the disparity in operational parameters, the simulations can be used to interpret experimental results.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)284-292
Number of pages9
JournalMicroscopy Research and Technique
Volume72
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Mar 1

Keywords

  • Dislocation
  • Simulation
  • Transmission electron microscope

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Histology
  • Instrumentation
  • Medical Laboratory Technology

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