Co-managed research: Non-Indigenous thoughts on an Indigenous toponymy project in northern British Columbia

Karen Heikkilä, Gail Andrea Fondahl

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper reflects on the methodological challenges of co-managed research as experienced from a non-Indigenous perspective. In 2003, Tl'azt'en Nation and the authors initiated a toponymy study that involved finding a curricular use for Dakelh place names. In this article, we chronicle our experiences with negotiating and managing this study with Tl'azt'en Nation. Some events are specific to the topic; others are characteristic of co-managed research in general. We offer insights into what it means as non-Indigenous researchers to enter discursive territory that is charged with emotion and cultural sensitivity, and also explore the often contentious issues that can arise in Indigenous research, particularly oral history, ethnohistorical interpretation, and cultural representation. The paper concludes by discussing the opportunities and challenges of co-managed research.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)61-86
    Number of pages26
    JournalJournal of Cultural Geography
    Volume29
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012 Feb 1

    Keywords

    • British Columbia
    • Indigenous
    • co-managed research
    • collaborative research
    • methodology
    • toponymy

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Cultural Studies
    • Geography, Planning and Development

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