Chronic exposure to sidestream tobacco smoke augments lung C-fiber responsiveness in young guinea pigs

T. Mutoh, A. C. Bonham, K. S. Kott, J. P. Joad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children chronically exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) have more coughs, wheezes, and airway obstruction, which may result in part from stimulation of lung C fibers. We examined the effect of chronic exposure to sidestream tobacco smoke (SS, a surrogate for ETS) on lung C-fiber responsiveness in guinea pigs, in which dynamic compliance (Cdyn), lung resistance, tracheal pressure, arterial blood pressure, and heart rate were also monitored. Guinea pigs were exposed to SS (1 mg/mm3 total suspended particulates) or filtered air 5 days/wk from 1 to 6 wk of age. They were then anesthetized, and lung C fibers (n = 55), identified by a conduction velocity of <2.0 m/s, were tested for responsiveness to chemical and mechanical stimuli. SS exposure doubled C-fiber responsiveness to left atrial capsaicin (P = 0.02) and lung hyperinflation (P = 0.03) but had no effect on responsiveness to inhaled capsaicin or bradykinin or on baseline activity. The data indicate that chronically exposing young guinea pigs to SS enhances C-fiber sensitivity to certain stimuli and may help explain respiratory symptoms in children exposed to ETS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)757-768
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume87
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Airways
  • Bronchopulmonary C fibers
  • Environmental tobacco smoke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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