Chelating compound, chrysoidine, is more effective in both antiprion activity and brain endothelial permeability than quinacrine

Katsumi Doh-Ura, Kazuhiko Tamura, Yoshiharu Karube, Mikihiko Naito, Takashi Tsuruo, Yasufumi Kataoka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. As an extension of our previous study of quinacrine and its derivatives, chelating chemicals were screened to obtain more effective, better brain-permeable antiprion compounds using either prion-infected neuroblastoma cells or brain capillary endothelial cells. 2. Eleven chemicals were found to have antiprion activity. Most of them shared a common structure consisting of benzene or naphthalene at either end of an azo bond. Structure-activity data suggest that chelating activity is not necessary but might contribute to the antiprion action. 3. Chrysoidine, a representative compound found here, was about 27 times more effective in the antiprion activity and five times more efficiently permeable through the brain capillary endothelial cells than quinacrine was. 4. These chemicals might be useful as compounds for development of therapeutics for prion diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)303-316
Number of pages14
JournalCellular and molecular neurobiology
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 May

Keywords

  • Aromatic azo compounds
  • Blood-brain barrier
  • Brain endothelial cells
  • Chelating agents
  • Chrysoidine
  • Prion
  • Prion-infected neuroblastoma cells
  • Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cell Biology

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