Characterization of Plasmodium falciparum cdc2-related kinase and the effects of a CDK inhibitor on the parasites in erythrocytic schizogony

Tatsuya Iwanaga, Tatsuki Sugi, Kyousuke Kobayashi, Hitoshi Takemae, Haiyan Gong, Akiko Ishiwa, Fumi Murakoshi, Frances C. Recuenco, Taisuke Horimoto, Hiroomi Akashi, Kentaro Kato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cell cycle of Plasmodium is unique among major eukaryotic cell cycle models. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are thought to be the key molecular switches that regulate cell cycle progression in the parasite. However, little information is available about Plasmodium CDKs. The present study was performed to investigate the effects of a CDK inhibitor, olomoucine, on the erythrocytic growth of Plasmodium falciparum. This agent inhibited the growth of the parasite at the trophozoite/schizont stage. Furthermore, we characterized the Plasmodium CDK homolog, P. falciparum cdc2-related kinase-1 (Pfcrk-1), which is a potential target of olomoucine. We synthesized a functional kinase domain of Pfcrk-1 as a GST fusion protein using a wheat germ protein expression system, and examined its phosphorylation activity. The activity of this catalytic domain was higher than that of GST-GFP control, but the same as that of a kinase-negative mutant of Pfcrk-1. After the phosphatase treatment, the labeling of [γ-32P]ATP was abolished. Recombinant human cyclin proteins were added to these kinase reactions, but there were no differences in activity. This report provides important information for the future investigation of Plasmodium CDKs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)423-430
Number of pages8
JournalParasitology International
Volume62
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Oct 1
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cyclin
  • Olomoucine
  • Pfcrk-1
  • Plasmodium falciparum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Characterization of Plasmodium falciparum cdc2-related kinase and the effects of a CDK inhibitor on the parasites in erythrocytic schizogony'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this