Changes in sugar uptake by excised discs and its stimulation by abscisic and indoleacetic acids during melon fruit development

John Ofosu-Anim, Yoshinori Kanayama, Shohei Yamaki

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    To clarify how ABA and IAA may mediate sugar uptake during fruit development, the kinetics of sugar accumulation by excised discs of melon (Cucumis melo L. cv. Prince) was studied. Uptake kinetics for glucose and fructose in discs of young and premature fruit, 14 and 28 days after pollination, respectively, and for sucrose in young tissues have biphasic (curvilinear) concentration curves. This indicates the presence of both carrier-mediated and simple diffusional uptake systems. The carrier-mediated system occurs at lower sugar concentrations for the three sugars in young fruit, but for glucose and fructose in premature fruits; it was not detectable in mature fruit 42 days after pollination. The Km value for carrier-mediated sugar uptake ranged from 6 to 14 mM and did not change with fruit development and among sugars. ABA at 10-5M enhanced the simple diffusional uptake of the three sugars, whereas IAA at the same concentration stimulated the carrier-mediated system of the three sugars but not the simple diffusional uptake system for sucrose. The roles of ABA and IAA on the carrier-mediated and simple diffusional uptakes systems for sugars seem to be very important during the growth and maturation of the melon fruit.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)170-175
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of the Japanese Society for Horticultural Science
    Volume67
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1998 Mar

    Keywords

    • Abscisic acid
    • Indoleacetic acid
    • Melon fruit
    • Membrane transport
    • Sugar uptake

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Horticulture

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