Change in psychological distress following change in workplace social capital: Results from the panel surveys of the J-HOPE study

Toru Tsuboya, Akizumi Tsutsumi, Ichiro Kawachi

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose Research on the longitudinal association of workplace social capital and mental health is limited. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prospective association of social capital in the workplace with mental distress, measured by K6, adjusting for individuals factors as well as workplace-related factors among employees in Japan. Methods The participants included 6387 men and 1825 women from 12 private companies in Japan. Questionnaires, inquiring about workplace social capital, K6, job strain and effort-reward imbalance were administered at the baseline survey between October 2010 and December 2011 (response rate=77.4%). At 1-year follow-up, social capital and K6 were assessed again (follow-up rate=79.5%), and a generalised linear model was used to estimate the association between changes in workplace social capital and change in K6. Results After adjusting for baseline demographic characteristics and workplace-related factors (Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ), Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire (ERIQ)), increased workplace social capital between waves was associated with improved psychological distress (β=-0.2327, p<0.0001). An inverse association was found in both men and women, all age groups, and among employees with high or low baseline mental health. The association was stronger among those who reported higher stress at baseline. Conclusions Boosting workplace social capital may promote mental health in the workplace.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)188-194
Number of pages7
JournalOccupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume72
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Mar 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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