Carnosine and anserine in chicken can quench toxic acrylamide under cooking conditions: Mass spectrometric studies on adduct formation and characterization

Aoi Takama, Hiroko Matsubara, Seon Hwa Lee, Tomoyuki Oe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Acrylamide (AA) is a toxic industrial chemical but is also found in heated potato foods such as French fries due to the Maillard reaction between amino acids and reducing sugars. However, high-temperature cooking is often required for flavoring, browning, and sterilizing of raw ingredients. Imidazole dipeptides, such as carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine, CAR) and anserine (β-alanyl-Nπ-methyl-L-histidine, ANS), are present in high concentrations in meat and are known to scavenge radical species and toxic aldehydes. Here, we investigated the reaction between CAR/ANS and AA under several conditions expected to detoxify AA by cooking with meat. The reaction products were characterized by LC–ESI-MS/MS as CAR/ANS-AA adducts at the N-terminus, and His-Nτ/Nπ. The reactivity of CAR sites toward AA were in the order N-terminus > Nτ > Nπ. A selective LC–ESI-SRM/MS method was also developed and confirmed the formation of CAR/ANS-AA adducts during pan frying of minced potato and chicken breast.

Original languageEnglish
Article number127480
JournalFood Chemistry
Volume333
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Dec 15

Keywords

  • Acrylamide
  • Adducts
  • Anserine
  • Carnosine
  • Glycidamide
  • Imidazole dipeptides
  • Mass spectrometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Food Science

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