Carlactone is converted to carlactonoic acid by MAX1 in Arabidopsis and its methyl ester can directly interact with AtD14 in vitro

Satoko Abe, Aika Sado, Kai Tanaka, Takaya Kisugi, Kei Asami, Saeko Ota, Hyun Il Kim, Kaori Yoneyama, Xiaonan Xie, Toshiyuki Ohnishi, Yoshiya Seto, Shinjiro Yamaguchi, Kohki Akiyama, Koichi Yoneyama, Takahito Nomura

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    162 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Strigolactones (SLs) stimulate seed germination of root parasitic plants and induce hyphal branching of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the rhizosphere. In addition, they have been classified as a new group of plant hormones essential for shoot branching inhibition. It has been demonstrated thus far that SLs are derived from carotenoid via a biosynthetic precursor carlactone (CL), which is produced by sequential reactions of DWARF27 (D27) enzyme and two carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases CCD7 and CCD8. We previously found an extreme accumulation of CL in the more axillary growth1 (max1) mutant of Arabidopsis, which exhibits increased lateral inflorescences due to SL deficiency, indicating that CL is a probable substrate for MAX1 (CYP711A1), a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase. To elucidate the enzymatic function of MAX1 in SL biosynthesis, we incubated CL with a recombinant MAX1 protein expressed in yeast microsomes. MAX1 catalyzed consecutive oxidations at C-19 of CL to convert the C-19 methyl group into carboxylic acid, 9-desmethyl-9-carboxy-CL [designated as carlactonoic acid (CLA)]. We also identified endogenous CLA and its methyl ester [methyl carlactonoate (MeCLA)] in Arabidopsis plants using LC-MS/MS. Although an exogenous application of either CLA or MeCLA suppressed the growth of lateral inflorescences of the max1 mutant, MeCLA, but not CLA, interacted with Arabidopsis thaliana DWARF14 (AtD14) protein, a putative SL receptor, as shown by differential scanning fluorimetry and hydrolysis activity tests. These results indicate that not only known SLs but also MeCLA are biologically active in inhibiting shoot branching in Arabidopsis.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)18084-18089
    Number of pages6
    JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
    Volume111
    Issue number50
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014 Dec 16

    Keywords

    • Arabidopsis
    • Biosynthesis
    • Cytochrome P450
    • Rice
    • Strigolactone

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • General

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  • Cite this

    Abe, S., Sado, A., Tanaka, K., Kisugi, T., Asami, K., Ota, S., Il Kim, H., Yoneyama, K., Xie, X., Ohnishi, T., Seto, Y., Yamaguchi, S., Akiyama, K., Yoneyama, K., & Nomura, T. (2014). Carlactone is converted to carlactonoic acid by MAX1 in Arabidopsis and its methyl ester can directly interact with AtD14 in vitro. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(50), 18084-18089. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1410801111