Cardiovascular depression and stabilization by central vasopressin in rats

Y. Imai, K. Abe, S. Sasaki, N. Minami, M. Munakata, H. Sakuma, J. Hashimoto, T. Nobunaga, H. Sekino, K. Yoshinaga

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of endogenous vasopressin in cardiovascular homeostasis was examined using vasopressin-deficient rats (Brattleboro) (n=194) and their parent strain, Long-Evans rats (n=181). Mean arterial pressure (blood pressure) and heart rate were measured every 4 seconds with or without infusion of drug solution for 21 hours, and mean values and their standard deviations (lability) were calculated. Blood pressure in Brattleboro rats (116±1.1 mm Hg, mean±SEM) was significantly higher than that in Long-Evans rats (96±0.7 mm Hg, p<0.001), whereas heart rates (381±3.3 and 375±2.9 beats/min, respectively) were similar. The lability of blood pressure and heart rate in Brattleboro rats (9.2±0.1 mm Hg and 42.3±0.7 beats/min) was also greater than that in Long-Evans rats (6.7±0.1 mm Hg, p<0.001 and 38.4±0.8 beats/min, p<0.01, respectively). In Brattleboro rats, intravenous vasopressin (0.1 ng/kg/min or 0.6 ng/kg/min) did not affect blood pressure, although it did reduce heart rate and decreased lability of blood pressure and heart rate. Intracerebroventricular (central) infusion of vasopressin (2 pg/kg/min) in Brattleboro rats induced initial hypertension and tachycardia followed by long-lasting hypotension and bradycardia, whereas in Long-Evans rats it induced only hypertension and tachycardia. In both strains, central vasopressin dramatically decreased the lability of blood pressure and heart rate. Neither intravenous (0.2 ng/kg/min) nor central desmopressin (2 pg/kg/min or 0.2 ng/kg/min), a V2 renal receptor agonist, changed any of these parameters in Brattleboro rats, although both diminished urinary volume. Neither intravenous (50 ng/kg/min) nor central (3.3 pg/kg/min) d(CH2)5-Tyr(Me)-arginine vasopressin, a vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist, modulated any of these parameters in Long-Evans rats. These results suggest that endogenous as well as exogenous vasopressin acts centrally as a cardiovascular inhibitor and stabilizer through a receptor mechanism other than V1 or V2 receptor mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-300
Number of pages10
JournalHypertension
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1990

Keywords

  • Arginine vasopressin
  • Blood pressure
  • Brattleboro rat
  • Central nervous system
  • Heart rate
  • Long-Evans rat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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