Carbon materials syntheses using dielectric barrier discharge microplasma in supercritical carbon dioxide environments

Takaaki Tomai, Ken Katahira, Hirotake Kubo, Yoshiki Shimizu, Takeshi Sasaki, Naoto Koshizaki, Kazuo Terashima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, carbon materials syntheses using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) microplasma in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) environments are reported. The dependencies of the carbon materials synthesis processing on the environmental temperature, environmental pressure and power frequency were investigated. In contrast to atmospheric-pressure CO2 environments, in which no carbon materials could be fabricated, it was possible to fabricate various carbon materials, such as amorphous carbon, graphite and nanostructured carbon materials, using scCO2 as a processing medium and a raw starting material. In particular, in the vicinity of the critical point of CO2, the quantity of carbon nanostructured materials, such as carbon nanotubes and carbon nanohorns, was larger than under other scCO2 conditions. It is supposed that the high density and molecular clustering caused by supercritical conditions may affect the formation of such carbon nanostructured materials. In addition, we found that by varying the power frequency, the form of the synthesized carbon materials could be changed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)404-411
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Supercritical Fluids
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Jul
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Carbon nanomaterials
  • Carbon nanotube
  • Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD)
  • Materials processing
  • Microplasma
  • Supercritical fluids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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