Can playing with toy blocks reflect behavior problems in children?

Xiyue Wang, Kazuki Takashima, Tomoaki Adachi, Yoshifumi Kitamura

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Although children's behavioral and mental problems are generally diagnosed in clinical settings, the prediction and awareness of children's mental wellness in daily settings are getting increased attention. Toy blocks are both accessible in most children's daily lives and provide physicality as a unique non-verbal channel to express their inner world. In this paper, we propose a toy block approach for predicting a range of behavior problems in young children (46 years old) measured by the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). We defned and classifed a set of quantitative play actions from IMU-embedded toy blocks. Play data collected from 78 preschoolers revealed that specifc play actions and patterns indicate total problems, internalizing problems, and aggressive behavior in children. The results align with our qualitative observations, and suggest the potential of predicting the clinical behavior problems of children based on short free-play sessions with sensor-embedded toy blocks.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCHI 2021 - Proceedings of the 2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Subtitle of host publicationMaking Waves, Combining Strengths
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
ISBN (Electronic)9781450380966
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 May 6
Event2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: Making Waves, Combining Strengths, CHI 2021 - Virtual, Online, Japan
Duration: 2021 May 82021 May 13

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings

Conference

Conference2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: Making Waves, Combining Strengths, CHI 2021
Country/TerritoryJapan
CityVirtual, Online
Period21/5/821/5/13

Keywords

  • Behavior problems
  • Cbcl
  • Childre
  • Free play
  • Motion data
  • Tangibles for health
  • Toy blocks
  • Well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Software

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