Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase IV contributes to translation-dependent early synaptic potentiation in the anterior cingulate cortex of adult mice

Hiroki Toyoda, Ming Gao Zhao, Valentina Mercaldo, Tao Chen, Giannina Descalzi, Satoshi Kida, Min Zhuo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase IV (CaMKIV) phosphorylates the major transcription factor, cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), which plays key roles in synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. Our previous study showed that long-term potentiation (LTP) in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) was significantly enhanced in transgenic mice overexpressing CaMKIV. Considering that the CaMKIV-CREB pathway plays a central role in the protein synthesis-dependent LTP, it is possible that upregulation of CaMKIV contributes to enhancement of LTP by promoting protein synthesis. To test this possibility, we examined the effects of transcription and translation inhibitors on synaptic potentiation induced by pairing of synaptic activity with postsynaptic depolarization (paired training) in ACC pyramidal neurons of wild-type and CaMKIV transgenic mice. We found that synaptic potentiation induced by paired training was partially inhibited by transcription or translation inhibitors both in wild-type and CaMKIV transgenic mice; the extent of inhibition was markedly larger in the CaMKIV transgenic mice than in the wild-type mice. Biochemical and immunohistochemical studies revealed that CaMKIV was distributed in the membrane, cytosol and nucleus of ACC neurons. Our results reveal in the first time a transcription- and translation-dependent component of early synaptic LTP in adult ACC synapses, and demonstrate that CaMKIV enhances early synaptic potentiation by activating new protein synthesis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number27
JournalMolecular brain
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Sep 20

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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