Brain temperature measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy to predict clinical outcome in patients with infarction

Tomohisa Ishida, Takashi Inoue, Tomoo Inoue, Toshiki Endo, Miki Fujimura, Kuniyasu Niizuma, Hidenori Endo, Teiji Tominaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Acute ischemic stroke is characterized by dynamic changes in metabolism and hemody-namics, which can affect brain temperature. We used proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy under everyday clinical settings to measure brain temperature in seven patients with internal carotid artery occlusion to explore the relationship between lesion temperature and clinical course. Regions of interest were selected in the infarct area and the corresponding contralateral region. Single-voxel MR spectroscopy was performed using the following parameters: 2000-ms repetition time, 144-ms echo time, and 128 excitations. Brain temperature was calculated from the chemical shift between water and N-acetyl aspartate, choline-containing compounds, or creatine phosphate. Within 48 h of onset, compared with the contralateral region temperature, brain temperature in the ischemic lesion was lower in five patients and higher in two patients. Severe brain swelling occurred subsequently in three of the five patients with lower lesion temperatures, but in neither of the two patients with higher lesion temperatures. The use of proton MR spectroscopy to measure brain temperature in patients with internal carotid artery occlusion may predict brain swelling and subsequent motor deficits, allowing for more effective early surgical intervention. Moreover, our methodology allows for MR spectroscopy to be used in everyday clinical settings.

Original languageEnglish
Article number490
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalSensors (Switzerland)
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Jan 2

Keywords

  • Acute ischemic stroke
  • Brain temperature
  • Cerebral blood flow change
  • Clinical outcomes
  • Less invasive
  • Magnetic resonance spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Biochemistry
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Instrumentation
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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