Brain stem infarction due to basilar artery dissection in a patient with moyamoya disease four years after successful bilateral revascularization surgeries

Takatsugu Abe, Miki Fujimura, Shunji Mugikura, Hidenori Endo, Teiji Tominaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebrovascular disease with an unknown etiology and is characterized by intrinsic fragility in the intracranial vascular walls such as the affected internal elastic lamina and thinning medial layer. The association of MMD with intracranial arterial dissection is extremely rare, whereas that with basilar artery dissection (BAD) has not been reported previously. A 46-year-old woman developed brain stem infarction due to BAD 4 years after successful bilateral superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis with indirect pial synangiosis for ischemic-onset MMD. She presented with sudden occipitalgia and subsequently developed transient dysarthria and mild hemiparesis. Although a transient ischemic attack was initially suspected, her condition deteriorated in a manner that was consistent with left hemiplegia with severe dysarthria. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed brain stem infarction, and MR angiography delineated a double-lumen sign in the basilar artery, indicating BAD. She was treated conservatively and brain stem infarction did not expand. One year after the onset of brain stem infarction, her activity of daily living is still dependent (modified Rankin Scale of 4), and there were no morphological changes associated with BAD or recurrent cerebrovascular events during the follow-up period. The association of MMD with BAD is extremely rare. While considering the common underlying pathology such as an affected internal elastic lamina and fragile medial layer, the occurrence of BAD in a patient with MMD in a stable hemodynamic state is apparently unique.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e79-e82
JournalJournal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jun 1

Keywords

  • Basilar artery dissection
  • brain stem infarction
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • moyamoya disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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