Body weight control by a high-carbohydrate/low-fat diet slows the progression of diabetic kidney damage in an obese, hypertensive, type 2 diabetic rat model

Shuichi Ohtomo, Yuko Izuhara, Masaomi Nangaku, Takashi Dan, Sadayoshi Ito, Charles Van Ypersele De Strihou, Toshio Miyata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity is one of several factors implicated in the genesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Obese, hypertensive, type 2 diabetic rats SHR/NDmcr-cp were given, for 12 weeks, either a normal, middle-carbohydrate/middle-fat diet (MC/MF group) or a high-carbohydrate/low-fat diet (HC/LF group). Daily caloric intake was the same in both groups. Nevertheless, the HC/LF group gained less weight. Despite equivalent degrees of hypertension, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, and even a poorer glycemic control, the HC/LF group had less severe renal histological abnormalities and a reduced intrarenal advanced glycation and oxidative stress. Mediators of the renoprotection, specifically linked to obesity and body weight control, include a reduced renal inflammation and TGF-beta expression, together with an enhanced level of adiponectin. Altogether, these data identify a specific role of body weight control by a high-carbohydrate/low-fat diet in the progression of DN. Body weight control thus impacts on local intrarenal advanced glycation and oxidative stress through inflammation and adiponectin levels.

Original languageEnglish
Article number136502
JournalJournal of Obesity
Volume2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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