Blood clearance and biodistribution of polymer brush-afforded silica particles prepared by surface-initiated living radical polymerization

Kohji Ohno, Tatsuki Akashi, Yoshinobu Tsujii, Masaya Yamamoto, Yasuhiko Tabata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The physiological properties of polymer brush-afforded silica particles prepared by surface-initiated living radical polymerization were investigated in terms of the circulation lifetime in the blood and distribution in tissues. Hydrophilic polymers consisting mainly of poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) were grafted onto silica particles by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization that was mediated by a copper complex to produce hairy hybrid particles. A series of hybrid particles was synthesized by varying the diameter of the silica core and the chain length of the polymer brush to examine the relationship between their physicochemical and physiological properties. The hybrid particles were injected intravenously into mice to investigate systematically their blood clearance and body distribution. It was revealed that the structural features of the hybrid particles significantly affected their in vivo pharmacokinetics. Some hybrid particles exhibited an excellently prolonged circulation lifetime in the blood with a half life of ∼20 h. When such hybrid particles were injected intravenously into a tumor-bearing mouse, they preferentially accumulated in tumor tissue. The tumor-targeted delivery was optically visualized using hybrid particles grafted with fluorescence-labeled polymer brushes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)927-936
Number of pages10
JournalBiomacromolecules
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Mar 12
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Materials Chemistry

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