Biweekly periodic variation of the Kuroshio axis northeast of Taiwan as revealed by ocean high-frequency radar

Daisuke Takahashi, Xinyu Guo, Akihiko Morimoto, Shoichiro Kojima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An analysis of surface current data obtained from 2002 to 2005 using long-range high-frequency radar provides the first evidence for the presence of biweekly (11-14 day) periodic variations of the Kuroshio axis northeast of Taiwan. This analysis clarifies the spatiotemporal characteristics of these variations and reveals that cyclonic/anticyclonic eddies propagating along the shelf slope from the vicinity of the deep channel east of Taiwan induce these variations northeast of Taiwan. The behavior of the cyclonic/anticyclonic eddies on the shelf slope is well explained by 2nd-mode interior shelf waves advected by the Kuroshio's mean flow. Remote effects from the vicinity of the deep channel east of Taiwan, or from outside the East China Sea, are believed to play an important role in the generation of these biweekly periodic variations of the Kuroshio axis northeast of Taiwan. Moreover, on the shelf slope, these variations cause an onshore current across the shelf slope, suggesting topographically controlled upwelling. Therefore, the biweekly periodic variations of the Kuroshio axis northeast of Taiwan might contribute not only to the onshore transport of Kuroshio surface water but also to transport nutrient-rich Kuroshio subsurface water onto the shelf in the East China Sea.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1896-1907
Number of pages12
JournalContinental Shelf Research
Volume29
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Aug 20

Keywords

  • High-frequency radar
  • Interior shelf wave
  • Kuroshio axis variation
  • Northeast of Taiwan
  • Short-term flow fluctuation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Geology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Biweekly periodic variation of the Kuroshio axis northeast of Taiwan as revealed by ocean high-frequency radar'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this